Born to Run

September 25, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Kentucky is known for a lot of things - like bluegrass and bourbon. And horses.

And horse racing.

I know next to nothing about horse racing. But I do know these animals were born to run. Do they know they're competing? Do they understand why they're galloping around in a circle with a bunch of other horses and an oddly dressed little guy on their back? I don't know.

But they definitely do seem to like running.

While in the bluegrass state, I took a few shots of actual horses. But my best shots were actually of horse statues, monuments to some legendary Thoroughbreds. 

One of the greatest Thoroughbred race horses ever was Man 'o War. At the Kentucky Horse Park, a prominent statue of him is surrounded by trees, which provided a nice background for this shot:

 

Man o' WarMan o' WarA statue of Man o' War, one of the most famous horses who ever lived, at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, KY.

 

Also at the Kentucky Horse Park is a bronze statue of maybe one of the best-known race horses of all time, Secretariat. I liked this statue because it includes his jockey and groom, and is essentially a candid shot. It depicts the horse being taken to the winner's circle after winning the Kentucky Derby. I moved in close to the statue and shot up, and managed to get Secretariat's head positioned in front of a white cloud, making it stand out that much better.

 

SecretariatSecretariatA statue of Secretariat, the famous Triple Crown winner, at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, KY.

 

Finally, a true action shot. This is a memorial to Barbaro, and is also his burial site, outside Churchill Downs in Louisville. Barbaro won the Kentucky Derby, but later broke his leg at the Preakness Stakes. Despite every attempt to save him, he eventually needed to be euthanized. I thought this statue was amazing in the way it depicted him in full gallop.

 

BarbaroBarbaroA statue outside Churchill Downs, marking the final resting place of Barbaro.

 

None of these are brilliant shots, but I thought the different ways they depicted these legendary Thoroughbreds was interesting.

 

 

 


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